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C-Reactive Protein (CRP) ELISA Kit

  • Created on the 22 March, 2017.

BACKGROUND

C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein that was first discovered and named due to its ability to precipitate the c-polysaccharide of pneumococcus in calcium. It is essentially classified as a superfamily of proteins that are known as pentraxins or pentaxins and these contain cyclic, non-glycosylated structures which are made up of apparently five identical globular non-covalently linked subunits that can be aggregated symmetrically. Each of these subunits are 206 amino acids (23.05 kD) and the total molecular weight of CRP is 117.5 kDa, consisting of 14 anti-parallel beta-strands that are arranged in two beta-sheets form.

During the acute phase response, the concentration of CRP can increase up to 1000-fold within a few hours. Whereas, normally in human biological fluids it is only present in trace amounts (approx.  0.6 mg/L). Certain cytokines (IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha or beta and indirectly by IL-6) are responsible for stimulating CRP, which results in dramatically enhancing its synthesis by hepatocytes. It has a rapid response time, short half-life and large incremental change. Among the acute phase proteins, CRP is the most sensitive, fast-reacting and the easiest to measure, also its catabolism is not affected by the type of inflammation. Serum concentration levels of CRP are found to significantly increase for infectious or non-infectious inflammations, for necrosis or tissue damage and during the presence of many malignant tumours.

INTENDED USE

Human CRP ELISA kit is designed for measuring in vitro quantitative amounts of c-reactive protein (CRP) in human plasma and serum samples. This assay has a minimum detection limit of < 1.0 µg/ml.

SENSITIVITY

The minimum detection sensitivity level of c-reactive protein using this human CRP ELISA kit was 1.0 µg/ml. The dynamic assay range for this kit is 5.0 – 100.0 µg /ml.

REFERENCES

  1. C-reactive protein and the biology of disease. Immunol Res. (2013) 56 (1): 131-42. Review. Ansar W. and Ghosh S.
  2. Current analytical strategies for C-reactive protein quantification in blood. Clin Chim Acta. (2013) 415:1-9. Review. Algarra M., et al.
  3. C-reactive protein: risk factor, biomarker and/or therapeutic target? Can J Cardiol. (2010) 26 Suppl A: 41A-44A. Review. Genest J.
  4. C-reactive protein and inflammation: conformational changes affect function. Biol Chem. (2015) 396 (11): 1181-97. Review. Wu Y., et al.
  5. Recognition functions of pentameric C-reactive protein in cardiovascular disease. Mediators Inflamm. (2014) 2014: 319215. Review. Agrawal A., et al.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  • Full Name: C-Reactive Protein (CRP) ELISA Kit
  • Reactivity: Human
  • Sample Type: Serum, Plasma
  • Sensitivity: < 1.0 µg/ml

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